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11/16/2012 1:22:42 PM
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*Very Quick* Chemistry Highschool Question, PLEASE help

nvm got help, thanks everyone [Edited on 11.16.2012 6:35 AM PST]
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  • [quote][b]Posted by:[/b] PunxsatownyPhil I literally just finished a lab like that. In college.[/quote] Well its honors chem, so its probably a college prep class/available in college.
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  • I literally just finished a lab like that. In college.
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  • Be mindful that those colours aren't the only wavelengths of light emitted by those atoms, they're just the ones that are emitted most. Atoms have a characteristic emission spectrum that include a lot of different wavelengths. [url=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/52/Emission_spectrum-Fe.svg]An iron ion (not sure whether this is Fe2+ or 3+) spectrum looks like this, but when you burn it you'll only see one or two colours.[/url]
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  • [quote][b]Posted by:[/b] Muffin enforcer Ok, the energy of a photon of light (the particle model is only applicable here is given by E = h*f = h*c/(lambda). Thus, as wavelength decreases, energy of photons increases. Safe to say, you are only investigating this at a grade school level, so I'll keep it simple. Generally, the 'color' you see emitted from an atom originates from the photons emitted as electrons fall from an excited state to the lower ground state. This energy will be exactly equal to the difference between the energy levels. The energy emitted by atoms of a higher mass number will not necessarily have a higher energy - although they will have a characteristic emission spectrum, so your theory is incorrect. [/quote] Thank you so much man, I found my hypothesis to be wrong as well, the higher atomic numbers did not make it roygbiv. thanks again :) Ion Flame Color barium, Ba2+ 56 Yellow green lithium, Li+ 3 Red orange copper, Cu2+ 29 Emerald green strontium, Sr2+ 38 Yellow orange potassium, K+ 19 White violet sodium, Na+ 11 Neon red potassium, K+ (cobalt glas19 Pink sodium, Na+ (cobalt glass 11 Lavender w/gold unknown, U Golden wheat salt substitute White violet flame crystals Golden
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  • Ok, the energy of a photon of light (the particle model is only applicable here is given by E = h*f = h*c/(lambda). Thus, as wavelength decreases, energy of photons increases. Safe to say, you are only investigating this at a grade school level, so I'll keep it simple. Generally, the 'color' you see emitted from an atom originates from the photons emitted as electrons fall from an excited state to the lower ground state. This energy will be exactly equal to the difference between the energy levels. The energy emitted by atoms of a higher mass number will not necessarily have a higher energy - although they will have a characteristic emission spectrum, so your theory is incorrect.
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  • [quote]redacted [/quote]Thanks [Edited on 11.16.2012 6:34 AM PST]
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  • Newtons 2nd Law will help.
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  • Atoms don't emit colour bro, could you perhaps tell us the whole experiment?
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