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Jonah Flex

Jonah Flex

Edited: 8/27/2014 9:34:04 AM
Throwing a large DDoS attack on servers isn't Hacking. It's like clogging a toilet and can happen to anyone and just because it didn't happen to you yet doesn't mean it can't. And to the ones who don't know what DDoS is, it is Distributed Denial-Of-Service: Form of electronic attack involving multiple computers, which send repeated HTTP requests or pings to a server to load it down and render it inaccessible for a period of time. Edit: Since some people aren't very bright lets dig a little deeper. A website is technically a "service", a software-based system that responds in a particular way to incoming requests from client software—in this case a web browser. But a web browser's requests can be easily faked. A web server can only respond efficiently to a certain number of requests for pages, graphics and other website elements at once. Exceed that number, and it bogs down. Go too far, and the system may become entirely unresponsive. Huge floods of traffic, whether legitimate or not, can thus cripple a server. While DoS attacks do not usually result in information theft or any security loss for a company, they can cost an organization both time and money while their network services are down. For the hacker (or the script kiddies who often use DoS attacks), a DoS attack is usually committed for "ego boosting" purposes. No server is safe! Anyone can do this by simply downloading the software and logging in. It's a little more to it but I won't go into detail because we don't need more script kiddies. The reason I put #uneducatedfanboys in my post is because a fanboy's mind is clouded by the item their a fan of and won't bother with trying to understand why I posted this.

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