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GodlyPerfection

GodlyPerfection

9/16/2010 9:35:48 PM
[i]Welcome to the twenty second of my level design theory lessons to help all future forgers for Halo: Reach. Sure anyone can build a map now, but can you make your map enjoyable, play well, and have it stand out to the other thousand of maps coming out? If you want to improve, continue on and read this lesson as well as its brethren. For more information about this series and links to the other lessons check out the main [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=48657907]Forge Lessons index thread[/url]. If you missed the previous one here you go: [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=48843062]Lesson 21: Incentive Weighting[/url]. Enjoy my fellow Halo fans and I hope this helps.[/i] Have you ever taken a picture of yourself or family and friends centered in the picture? Have you noticed that the picture just doesn't feel right and doesn't feel pleasing? Have you ever placed an object directly in front of someone for it just to go unnoticed? That's because a person's focus is typically not on the center of their current [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=48662496]perspective[/url]. Learning to place objects at a player's focus point is key to ensuring that they notice what you are trying to show them. [b][u]Rule of thumb[/u][/b] Remember when we talked about how perspectives are like pictures or photographs? Well applying common techniques used in art and photography can be used to truly help enhance a player's experience on your map. Photography is all about object placement, depth, scene composition, as well as various other techniques. I'm not an expert so don't judge me when I talk about their techniques. However I do know that one common rule of thumb that photographers use is known as the "rule of thirds". The rule of thirds states that if you divide a picture, photograph, screenshot, or whatever into thirds both vertically and horizontally, the perspectives main points of focus lie at the intersections. [b][u]Not the center[/u][/b] So taking the basic definition of the rule of thirds we can take any good screenshot and divide it with two lines going vertically in thirds and two lines going horizontally in thirds and find the main focus points of the screenshot. What you end up getting is a little square in the center with its corners being used as focus points. This is why you see many pictures and self portraits with the subject slightly to the right or left and not directly in the center of the picture. If a painting is being drawn with the sun as a main focus it is normally placed at one of the top two corners of that center square. This rule is one of the simplest rules of photography and will help assist you in your quest towards becoming a great map designer. [b][u]Application[/u][/b] So now you've got the jist of the rule of thirds so let's take some time to re-tie it back in with level design. You should be very well versed in the definition of a perspective. Let's run through a scenario to help you get a bit more acquainted to working with the rule of thirds. Imagine setting up a [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=48717394]spawn perspective[/url] for your map. You want a player to first spawn and pickup the sniper rifle that is in front of them. First of all you want to place the spawn facing towards the general direction of the sniper rifle. Second, you want to set the sniper rifle a good distance away from a player in order to follow the [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=48719481]smooth spawning[/url] concept. Now keep in mind the spawning default eye level of the player. Tweak the spawn perspective so that the sniper rifle is placed near one of the four points of interest. Apply whatever [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=48714675]eye catching[/url] techniques you would like and viola you have encouraged your player to take the role of the sniper. Well done. This technique doesn't just have to be used on spawns. It can be used for when a player first walks through a doorway. Take the time to imagine the general direction that the player is facing and setup your objects based on the rule of thirds in order to maximize their attention. Make your map fun to play by making what they need to have fun easier to find. Don't you hide that good ol' rifle. [url=http://www.bungie.net/Forums/posts.aspx?postID=49182882][u]Continue on to Lesson 23: Static Perspectives --->[/u][/url] [Edited on 09.19.2010 6:35 PM PDT]

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